My profession is making prints.
To make an imprint on paper I start by engraving on copper or brass.

When I engrave I try to capture atmospheres celebrating the natural world, shedding light on its hidden recesses, exploring the silences. My aim is to leave sufficient room for the unknown or the unseen to appear. The dream process does the rest. The passing of time leaves a poetic trace, there is something powerful in the erosion of matter, something sacred in that which is lost.
The images created in my work are like maps that guide you towards this otherworld.

 

Annie Bocel graduated from the Estienne school of engraving, made her apprenticeship with engraver Jean-Luc Seigneur, then taught intaglio in a Parisian workshop and learned the impression of embossing within the company Creanog. Following this wealth of experience, Annie Bocel opened a printmaking workshop in northern Finistère and simultaneously became an engraver of typographic punches at the French National printing office. 

Annie Bocel’s prints are about nature, time, and imprint. Sensitive to the idea of ​​what is lost and what disappears, she likes to see things revealed and hear their stories. She believes writing and geometry are essential in this quest for forgotten forms.
Echoing this personal work and following a three-year transmission in the framework of the Maitre d’art program set up by INMA (National Institute of Art Craft), Annie Bocel contributes to higlighting the importance and conservation of typographic punches, a profession recently listed on the inventory of French intangible cultural heritage.

La gravure de poinçons typographiquesLa gravure de poinçons typographiques (1.89 Mo)

--> interview / Ministère de la Culture

 

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